Taking the mystery out of the mortgage process

English: Mortgage Backed Security

English: Mortgage Backed Security (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The home buying process can seem complicated and overwhelming for the average buyer. Helping your customers better understand the different phases in the mortgage loan process early on – and what is expected of them at each step – can help make the process less intimidating and reduce frustration.

Phase 1 – Origination:
This begins the mortgage process and is actually several steps. The loan officer will help the customer learn what their mortgage financing options are through a pre-qualification process, and assist with filling out a loan application and gathering the necessary documents.

Customers should know: They’ll need to provide income, asset and debt information, and their Social Security number to allow the lender to pull their credit report.

Phase 2 – Processing:
The loan processor will then collect, verify and review all required documentation provided by the buyer, order appraisals, order a title search and send all this information in a complete package to underwriting.

Customers should know: Processors will be checking for errors, discrepancies and possible missing information, so customers need to understand how critical it is to provide accurate, complete information in a timely manner.

Phase 3 – Underwriting:
The underwriter analyzes the documentation for accuracy and evaluates the customer’s ability to repay the loan based on their credit and employment histories. An appraisal and title review is completed to ensure the loan program guidelines are met, the title is clear, and to determine risk acceptability.

Customers should know: This is “decision time” as the underwriter weighs the risk of lending money and approves or denies the loan – so customers may be asked for additional financial information even at this stage.

Phase 4 – Closing (or Escrow):
The loan processor coordinates all aspects of the closing with the buyer and the closing agent and/or attorney. The closing agent conducts the closing, ensures that all necessary documents are signed, assures closing fees and escrow payments are made, and confirms that all documents are sent out to be recorded according to state and local requirements.

Customers should know: Before closing they should receive information explaining the closing costs, including a standardized Good Faith Estimate (GFE) of how much cash they will need at closing.

With keys in hand, the process is completed for the homebuyer, but there are still a number of steps that take place behind the scenes after closing.

  • Warehousing: About 10 days after closing, the lender uses their warehouse line [line of credit] to finance the new loan until it is “sold” to an investor on the secondary market.
  • Secondary market: Allows lenders to sell mortgages to investors, providing them [the lender] with new funds to offer home loans to new borrowers. Your customers’ mortgage rates are influenced by the yields demanded by these investors.

Typical investors of mortgage-backed securities in the secondary market include:

  • Shipping and delivery: Once an investor is secured, the loan is packaged with other loans,, and applicable documentation, and becomes part of a mortgage-backed security (MBS). These mortgage-backed securities are then delivered to the investor.
  • Loan administration/servicing: A loan servicer takes care of the administrative duties once the mortgage-backed securities are delivered to the investor. This includes: customer support, collection of mortgage payments, management of escrow accounts and fund recovery efforts.
Thanks to  Coldwell Banker Home Loans

 

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Price is not all that matters in real estate sales

Sellers typically prefer deals with fewer contingencies

By Dian Hymer, Monday, January 16, 2012.

Inman News®

Negotiation strategies differ depending on how well the home is priced and who’s on the other side. If you’re trying to buy a short-sale listing where the lender has to agree to accept less than the amount owed, the seller doesn’t have much say in the negotiations about price unless he can contribute money to pay down the loan amount.

Regardless of who you’re dealing with, you’re more likely to grab a seller’s or lender’s attention if you are preapproved for the mortgage you’ll need and can provide verification of cash for the down payment and closing costs.

Many buyers feel that cash is king. If buyers are willing and able to pay all cash with no mortgage, no hassling with the lender and no appraisal contingency, they feel they’re owed a price concession.

Not all sellers agree. Some, who are confident in the value of their home, would rather work with an offer from a well-qualified buyer who needs to obtain a mortgage but who will pay a higher price.

<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-59982p1.html">House and cash image</a> via Shutterstock.com.House and cash image via Shutterstock.com.

Negotiation strategies differ depending on how well the home is priced and who’s on the other side. If you’re trying to buy a short-sale listing where the lender has to agree to accept less than the amount owed, the seller doesn’t have much say in the negotiations about price unless he can contribute money to pay down the loan amount.

Regardless of who you’re dealing with, you’re more likely to grab a seller’s or lender’s attention if you are preapproved for the mortgage you’ll need and can provide verification of cash for the down payment and closing costs.

Many buyers feel that cash is king. If buyers are willing and able to pay all cash with no mortgage, no hassling with the lender and no appraisal contingency, they feel they’re owed a price concession.

Not all sellers agree. Some, who are confident in the value of their home, would rather work with an offer from a well-qualified buyer who needs to obtain a mortgage but who will pay a higher price.

Before you start negotiating, you should understand as much as you can about the other party. For instance, if the sellers are moving to a retirement home, they might go for the highest-priced offer in a multiple-offer situation, even though it might not be ideal in other regards. If they are liquidating their last asset, every penny will count.

An all-cash or large-cash-down buyer might not be able to negotiate a “deal” based on the fact that no lender will be involved. But if the home is a good value and suits your long-term needs, you might increase your offer price and include a mortgage. This way, you conserve cash for other uses.

HOUSE HUNTING TIP: Many buyers don’t want to negotiate. They want their first offer to be their best offer. Usually, the only time this is effective is if yours is the only offer, the house is priced right for the market, and you offer full price. In this market, you’re better off planning for some negotiation, and not putting all your cards on the table at once.

In most areas, the home-sale market still favors buyers. A lot of sellers are selling for less than they paid. Some have to bring money to the closing. Sellers who have owned for years are selling for less than they would have years ago. It’s natural that they would want to try for the highest price possible.

Negotiations are about more than price. Generally, the fewer the contingencies or the cleaner the contract, the more attractive it will be to the seller. Closing and possession dates can become issues at the bargaining table. What’s included and excluded, time periods to satisfy contingencies, and virtually everything in the contract is negotiable.

Since everything is up for grabs, be clear about what’s not negotiable — for instance, you can’t go over a certain price. Show flexibility in areas that will hopefully be valuable to the sellers, such as buying “as is” regarding some needed repairs.

Don’t waste your time with sellers who are firm at a price that is considerably over market value. Wait until they become realistic while you continue looking. Some sellers eventually get tired of having their home listed and reduce the price to market value. Others don’t.

Sellers need to understand that buyers in today’s market will walk away from a negotiation if they feel they’re not getting anywhere or are being treated unfairly. Buyers could become suspicious or disappear if they’re told by the sellers or their agent that other buyers are lining up to make an offer when they aren’t.

THE CLOSING: A smart strategy is to defend your position while being honest and fair with the other party.

Dian Hymer, a real estate broker with more than 30 years’ experience, is a nationally syndicated real estate columnist and author of “House Hunting: The Take-Along Workbook for Home Buyers” and “Starting Out, The Complete Home Buyer’s Guide.”